Introduction

You know Cleopatra—

Probably heard something about Tutankhamun….

Maybe the name Khufu/Kheops rings a bell.

These are rulers of ancient Egypt. Usually what the average person knows about ancient Egypt has to do with a king, a Pharaoh. Or maybe at least the reader has heard of Imhotep (no, not from the recent movie. Imhotep the man was much smarter and more powerful. After all, the Step Pyramid for which he is acclaimed as the architect can still be seen today.)

The history of Egypt sometimes gets overshadowed by that of Rome–the Caesars providing so much fodder for literature and movies. Alexander of Macedonia has garnered far more movie and book time for the average informed layperson.  The great city of Athens is renowned as the seat of democracy. All in all, ancient Egypt is famous far more for its pyramids, the Nile cruises, and an occasional new report about Tut and his family or how Cleo died, than for the real substance of its legacy to the world.

For the people of ancient Egypt/Kemet, every day was a new beginning. Creation came anew with every sun rise: the world was again pristine, opportunity wide, potential rich, and humans were encouraged to think reasonably and speak carefully.  Kingship worked in harmony with G-D and humanity, and even foreigners could aspire to a productive career, perhaps even one day stand at the side of the throne.

A legacy to which one can always turn in admiration and emulation. First, must come information and reasoned discussion.

Ptahhotep, Khaemwaset, Kagemni–all would have approved.

Do you want to know about more than just Cleopatra and Ramses? Want to know about the first workers’ strike? About the artisans, the scribes, the fishermen? You want to know about the other great women besides Nefertiti and Hatshepsut, those women who lived as “Divine Adoratrices” and held nearly royal power although never having that title?

Then step in. Sit, take some bread and beer, or cool water. And read on.

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